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5

BPO JAMAICA: MESSAGES

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018

WE NEED to focus on the right

supportive technology. The key areas

to watch are self-service, Internet of

things and robotic process

automation, artificial intelligence/voice

systems, omnichannel evolution, and

super-agent systems.

Don’t focus on individual technology

trends. Focus on how customer

behaviour is changing. How does the

customer learn about products and

make a purchase?

Put yourself in the shoes of the

customer and you will see the

upcoming trends that are important for

your business. The customer journey

is being redefined. We need to treat

the agents as rock stars.

MARK HILLARY

CEO, Carnaby Content

U

NTIL RECENTLY, the traditional

contact centre effectively acted as a

switch for customer enquiries. The

customer service representative would make

notes and fill in a form or route the caller to

another department.

Typically, the approach was low intelligence

– repeating steps that the customer could

have taken himself through using a self-

service mechanism.

We are now seeing a change in the nature

of the contact centre workforce, moving away

from the low-value, low-impact call centre

operative unable to offer much added value

beyond the ability to route the caller to

someone who can actually help.

Replacing these individuals are new

knowledge-based workers, experts on

particular topics who can be brought in to

provide help and advice as part of the virtual

contact centre experience.

Two-thirds of contact is occurring through

phone calls, with 54 per cent of customers

prefering this method of communication.

There is also a two-per cent drop in the

number of people using calls as a means of

contact and a three-per cent increase for chat

as a method for contact.

Customer satisfaction with chat

engagement dropped the least of all the

communication methods.

The growth of the client base has resulted

in different responses. Some are now offering

domestic support at a premium cost. If you

don’t want to pay the premium, you stay with

the nearshore support. Others are leaving

their back-office work and non-voice

communications in the offshore centres and

are bringing the voice calls back to the United

States.

Still others are working to bring language

skills and American culture to their offshore

and nearshore contact centre agents to

break down the perceived communication

barriers.

JEFF PAPPAS

Executive vice-president

ESRP Global Site Selection Practice Group

WHY JAMAICA?

OUR PEOPLE are

our most important

resource and

stakeholder:

Eighty-eight per

cent literacy rate

High calibre and

ambitious labour

pool

Strong written and

spoken English

Exposure to the

North American

culture, media, and

products

Exposure to technology, teledensity rate of 109 per cent

Positive association with our accent

Low attrition (high unemployment)

Pay-for-performance culture

Experienced and professional local management

Entrepreneurial opportunities:

First-World technology platform with redundancy

Travel time and cost

Proven track record with BPO

Flexibility of labour laws

Data security: Cyber Crime Bill 2012

Competitive business model

Business continuity

Purpose-built facilities

Stable political environment

Business and vacation destination with tropical

climate all year round

Stable economic environment

Government’s priority on the industry – role of the BPIAJ

ODETTA ROCKHEAD-KERR

MARKETDYNAMICSFOR

JAMAICA’SBPODELIVERY

JAMAICA NEEDS to emphasise digital elements in education. This means

focusing on making students comfortable using information technology, learning

via digital means, and solving problems with technology.

Digital customer experience management must not be forgotten; increasing

internet accessibility is a must; and most, important, Jamaica’s BPO sector and the

government need to continue working in tandem.

The digital BPO value will require ongoing investment in infrastructure, evolution

in approach to education, effective promotion to demand markets, and relevant

incentives.

Jamaica’s elected officials must listen to the industry players and associations,

provide a digitally driven legislative framework, and understand the

evolving labour market requirements. These steps will ensure

Jamaica’s digital viability over the longterm.

PETER RYAN

Principal of Ryan Strategic Advisory

The selection process – shared service centre

ROLEOF TECHNOLOGY

INTHEBPOSECTOR

A FEW SIGNIFICANT QUOTES