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OUR GUESTS ARE AS GOOD AS YOURS…

TODAY,

THE Gleaner

partners with The University of the West Indies for a special

guest editors’ edition. It is part of our recognition of the 70th anniversary of The

University of the West Indies.

The institution, with its main campuses in Mona, Jamaica; Cave Hill, Barbados; St

Augustine, Trinidad andTobago; and an Open Campus, has helped to shape significant

elements of Caribbean history in academics, sports, research, and other areas.

But just how has The UWI weathered the challenges over the years? Is it

meeting current expectations? And, what is its prospect as the region’s premier

tertiary training institution?

Vice-Chancellor Professor Sir Hilary Beckles leads a team of five who have

taken the editor’s office for this special issue. Enjoy!

SEPTEMBER 3, 2018

MONDAY

| VOL 184 . NO 209 . PAGES: 56 | KINGSTON, JAMAICA |

www.jamaica-gleaner.com

GCT

INC.

$70

MORE IN SECTION D

30 students head to

UWI’s China centre.

D2

Data protection, NIDS for

UWI’s cybersecurity

confab.

D3

When males

outnumbered females

at UWI.

D10

Have Caribbean youth

lost activism voice?

D9

From Shakespeare to

Shabba Ranks: Revising

Literary Studies.

D6

Blind and brilliant.

D1

Graduate

creates

money app

IMAGINE BEING swindled over

and over again because you

cannot tell the differences

among bank notes and coins.

That was the challenge

Trinidadian police officer Marlon

Parieaho faced when he lost his

sight to glaucoma in 2010.

Then, four years later, he

met Jamaican Ramone Graham,

a graduate of the Department

of Electrical and Computer

Engineering at UWI, St Augustine.

Graham had been working on

technology solutions to help

blind and visually impaired

citizens navigate the streets of

Trinidad and Tobago. Through

Graham’s intervention, within a

year, 22-year-old undergraduate

student Jesse Saito had been

recruited and mentored by Dr

Akash Pooransingh to develop

the Maverick mobile application,

which is now being used by

visually impaired people to

distinguish among different

denominations of Trinidadian

currency.

Maverick is the first of its kind

in the region and improves on

international apps, which cannot

accurately identify regional

currencies.

In all instances, emphasis has

T

HE UNIVERSITY of the West Indies

(UWI) is projecting that by 2022

when its strategic planning cycle

ends, it will be operational on every

continent.

“We are not stopping here,” said Vice-

Chancellor Professor Sir Hilary Beckles.

Already, the UWI has established

teaching and research centres in Suzhou,

China; New York, USA; and Lagos, Nigeria.

According to Beckles, the UWI Lagos

Centre for African and Diaspora Culture

established at the University of Lagos will

be rolled out in the coming weeks at the

Mona campus.

The UWI has planned other teaching

and research centres for South Africa,

England, the European Union, and

Canada.

“Wherever the region has an interest,

The UWI will be there to serve. This is our

role. We will be active and not passive

when it comes to development,” Beckles

said.

He said that at the moment, the

Caribbean has to be more globally

competitive, and so it needs a more

relevant and respected university.

“High-quality universities are not

established to serve themselves, but to

serve their nations and communities,” said

Beckles, who started his sojourn at The

UWI almost 40 years ago as a 24-year-old

lecturer at Mona.

The global projection is part of a five-

year UWI strategy, known as the Triple

‘A’, focusing on access to affordable

tertiary education, alignment of academia

with industry, and agility in a global

environment.

ENHANCING THE UWI BRAND

At the same time, Beckles said that the

overarching objective is to enhance the

UWI brand and upgrade its reputation to

provide the region with 21st-century

service and leadership.

The first test of UWI’s capacity for

global agilit y came in 2013 when

President Xi Jinping of China visited the

region and signed a treaty providing for

mutual technology cooperation.

The university then engaged regional

governments and moved to establish an

Office for Global Affairs with the

involvement of Jamaican diplomat

Professor Richard Bernal.

Be c k l e s i s pa r t i c u l a r l y e xc i t ed

about technology cooperation with

China.

“It was based on the recognition that

Caribbean industry would benefit from

this area of innovation, and it would ‘skill

up’ the next generation of students in

science and technology for the region’s

success during the Fourth Industrial

Revolution,” he said.

UWI GONE GLOBAL

Students of The University of the West Indies Cave Hill campus during a visit to partner institution, the Global Institute of Software Technology, in China this summer.

PLEASE SEE

MONEY

, A2