Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  2 / 13 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 2 / 13 Next Page
Page Background

|

www.jamaica-gleaner.com

|

UWI AT 70

THE GLEANER, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2018

A2

OPEN CAMPUS

Providing life-changing learning

2 9 18

15

3

31

16 26

6 342417

8 0

2

8

5

6

3

0

0

0

2

3

1

7

6

1

7

2

9

3

6

4

0

0

6

8

7

1 11 32 9 36

1

10, 13, 14, 16, 18, 24, 25, 26, 29, 30, 33, 34

1, 7, 10, 12, 13, 14, 16, 18, 22, 23, 33, 36

5, 6, 7, 13, 15, 25, 27, 29, 33, 34, 35, 36

1, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 26, 28, 30, 32, 33, 35

1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 12, 13, 15, 16, 20, 28, 29

4 6

15 22

26 30

11

1

9

18

$800,000

4

No Winner

19

Winners $1,196 ea.

479

Winners $85 ea.

No Winner

282

Winners $248 ea.

No Winner

6 Winners $12,467 ea.

15 Winners $638 ea.

3,768 Winners $100 ea.

$69,000,000

31

1

14

18

27

28

8

8

18

8

23

6

12

20

M M W W W W

1 15 16 17 18

9 10 14 16 22

1 2 13 18 22

4 5 13 19 21

1 11

14

20

21

10 Winners

$1,058 ea.

20 Winners

$1,000 ea.

11 Winners

$1,243 ea.

127 Winners

$266 ea.

No Winner

17

$234,500,000

4

0

5

0

4

5

8

No Winner

No Winner

187 Winners

$200 ea.

205 Winners

$213 ea.

43 Winners

$1,000 ea.

559 Winners

$200 ea.

No Winner

No Winner

21 Winners

$1,000 ea.

285 Winners

$200 ea.

Dr Luz Longsworth/Contributor

IN THIS 70th year of celebration

of The University of the West

Indies (UWI), we also celebrate

the 10th year of the formal

establishment of The UWI Open

Campus.

It was established as a

strategic thrust of the 2007-2012

strategic plan and given the

mandate to widen access

t h rough i nnova t i ve on l i ne

and continuing education

programmes, to increase the

university’s linkages to the

communities that it served

outside of the three landed

campuses, and to become sites

of development for each of our

countries.

To date, 44 Open Campus

Country Sites are strategically

placed in 16 countries to

engage communities by offering

educational opportunities to the

underserved and by meeting

academic and professional

development demands.

In addition to the offering of

over 50 online undergraduate

and graduate degrees, with

associated courses and doctoral

programmes in educational

leadership, the Open Campus

also provides hundreds of

relevant face-to-face continuing

and professional education

programmes that are relevant to

the 21st-century workforce.

6,000 ENROL ANNUALLY

Annual enrollment now stands

at over 6,000 students in fully

online degree programmes

regionally and internationally,

wi t h mo re t han 10 , 000

persons accessing continuing

and professional education

programmes each year.

The UWI Open Campus, with

its online experience and

community outreach expertise,

is therefore, central to the

university’s access pillar of the

Triple A Strategy – access,

alignment, and agility.

In keeping with its mandate, it

will continue to be the face of

The UWI in the virtual and

dispersed environment, bringing

together our people across the

Caribbean Sea and beyond.

With the recent investment

of CAD$31 million from the

Government of Canada, the

Caribbean Development Bank

and the Universal Fund Jamaica,

the campus is equipped and

ready to lead The UWI into the

digital world of this century.

I t will continue to enable

Caribbean nationals to reside at

home, to build nations, and keep

families together, while pursuing

their educational goals.

Dr Luz Longsworth, is the pro vice-

chancellor and principal, of The

UWI, Open Campus.

[FROM THE GUEST EDITORS]

Excellent and ethical

University education

within reach of poor

people

– professor

Population aged 15

years with tertiary-level

qualification in Barbados

Male

11,886

Total: 28,774

Female

16,888

Population aged 15 years

and over by sex with

tertiary-level qualifications

(% of total population)

Barbados

St Lucia

Male

Antigua

Dominica

Eastern Caribbean territories

served by the Cave Hill Campus

– St Lucia (2010 Population

and Housing Census)

– Antigua and Barbuda (2011

Population and Housing Census)

– 2000 Population and Housing Census

3.4

4.4

19

8.0

9.3

4.2

Female

Both sexes

Lynford Simpson/Gleaner Writer

D

ESPITE THE serious

economic challenges

facing most eastern

Caribbean countries whose

nationals make up the bulk of

the population at the University

of the West Indies (UWI) Cave Hill

campus, at least one senior

staffer is insistent that the cost of

a university education is not out

of reach of the average person.

Professor of Economics,

Winston Moore also argued that

prospective students often find

innovative ways to finance their

university education, including

borrowing from relatives.

Moore, based in Barbados, is

the university’s director of

graduate studies and research.

“Given that all children are

compelled to attend primary

school, we can take it that all

persons aged 15 years and over

would have attended primary

school,” Moore said in relation to

Barbados.

“We can then use the

information from the most recent

Population and Housing Census

(2010) to estimate the proportion

of persons that enter primary

school then obtain some type of

tertiary level qualification,”

Professor Moore noted.

Moore acknowledged that

Barbados has a significantly

higher percentage of its

population attending the UWI

because of its free tuition policy.

“ There has not been any

research on the link between the

cost of education and university

attendance, but from the

statistics you can clearly see the

benefits of Barbados’ free UWI

tuition policy on tertiary level

attainment in the island relative

to other Eastern Caribbean

states,”Moore told The Gleaner.

The Director of Graduate

Studies and Research said the

university has been developing a

suite of financing packages for

students.

“We essentially tell students to

apply and then let’s work with you

to find the funds. Our private

sector donors provide a suite of

scholarships at the graduate and

undergraduate levels based on

academic merit and financial need.

Moore said the Cave Hill

Financial Aid Programme also

gives part tuition fee waivers, and

there is a Student Hardship and

Emergency Fund for students

who run into unforeseen financial

emergencies that might prevent

them from continuing their

education. In addition, he said

tuition payment plans are offered.

He pointed to a graduate exit

survey carried out by the Quality

Assurance Office in 2017 and

which involved 227 respondents.

In that survey, a total of 64 per

cent of respondents reported

having taken some form of loan.

Respondents were able to select

more than one funding option

and figures for loan sources.

Loan sources for Cave Hill

students (%)

20

4

21

19

Barbados Student Loan Fund

Other Student Loan Fund

Loans taken from parents

or other family support

Personal/student loans taken

from financial institutions

T

HE JOURNEY to excellence

of The University of the

West Indies, ranked number

one in the Caribbean, began in

1948 with a small scholastic seed

planted in the soil of slavery

lands hitherto known as the

Mona and Papine sugar estate.

The nurturing received by the

people, from peasants to

parliamentarians, led to its

flowering. Ranked in 2018 as the

best in the Caribbean, it has

done more than survived. It has

thrived. The late, great Rex

Nettleford, who served as its

sixth vice-chancellor, once

described it as the region’s

greatest

gift

to

itself,

representing a proud legacy of

the collective thinking and

actions of Caribbean people.

The reception it received

suggested that the Jamaica

people were prepared to invest

in it their respect and generosity.

With this warm embrace, it

quickly grew to maturity and

soon mushroomed into multiple

campuses in Trinidad and

Tobago, and Barbados. Today,

with its Open Campus it is

everywhere in the region.

Critically, with its strategic global

thrust, it is poised to be

everywhere in the world.

From the bosom of its faculty,

a legacy of brilliant scholarship

erupted over the decades. It

constitutes the UWI brand that

has flourished as the light rising

in the west. No community of

scholars has done so much for so

many with so little. The UWI is

now a mighty academy of 50,000

students and scholars sworn to

protect and enhance its legacy

of excellence.

MATURE LEADERSHIP

It has been blessed with a

solid and mature leadership

from the beginning. Its

chancellors, vice-chancellors,

principals, pro vice chancellors,

deans, directors and other heads

of departments and units have

seen to it that the academy rose

above its many challenges and

grew in strength.

From Sir Arthur Lewis, its first

vice-chancellor, to Sir Hilary

Beckles, its current, both

economic historians and widely

published

scholars

and

development activists, The UWI

has had the benefit of leadership

and

vision

from

other

internationally known and

respected vice-chancellors such

as the Honourable Rex

Nettleford, Sir Philip Sherlock, Mr

A.Z. Preston, Sir Alister McIntyre

and Professor Nigel Harris.

In addition, chancellors of

renown stature such as Sir

Shridath ‘Sonny’ Ramphal and Sir

George Alleyne have presided

over its affairs.

The university is now poised for

even greater accomplishments.

Committed to a new strategic

vision of globalisation and the

search for a sounder financial

footing, it looks to the long

21st century with confidence

as its centenary beckons. It has

been congratulated for its 70

years of service and leadership,

but with progress along the

current trajectory, the time for

its greatest impact is yet to

come.

been placed on ensuring that

digital

solutions

remain

affordable and within reach of

every citizen. Many of them have

been designed by young people

who are encouraged and

mentored to compete and

engage in the rapidly evolving

global digital economy.

Twenty-eight-year-old

Oswald Chamber ’s Google

Transit app is a well-known

digital resource for navigating

the public transportation system

in Kingston and has been

adopted by the Jamaica Urban

Transit Company.

Less well-known, perhaps,

i s t he wo r k be i ng done by

s t a f f and s t uden t s on t he

AgriNett project in Trinidad

t o de ve l op “ I n t e l l i gen t

Decision Support” systems to

help farmers to enhance crop

management.

MONEY

CONTINUED FROM A1

The AgriNet app assists small farmers with the management of finances, soil and land analysis and monitoring

of daily market prices.

CONTRIBUTED